Temporal trends in sexually transmitted infection prevalence and condom use following introduction of the female condom

Int J STD AIDS 2007;18:461-466
doi:10.1258/095646207781147175
© 2007 Royal Society of Medicine Press


Original research articles

Temporal trends in sexually transmitted infection prevalence and condom use following introduction of the female condom to Madagascar sex workers

Temporal trends in sexually transmitted infection prevalence and condom use following introduction of the female condom to Madagascar sex workers
T H Hoke, P J Feldblum, K Van Damme, M D Nasution, T W Grey, E L Wong, L Ralimamonjy, L Raharimalala and A Rasamindrakotroka

Family Health International, Research Triangle Park, PO Box 13950, NC 27709, USA; Family Health International, Research Triangle Park, PO Box 13950, NC 27709, USA; UNC-MAD, Antananarivo, Madagascar; Family Health International, Research Triangle Park, PO Box 13950, NC 27709, USA; Family Health International, Research Triangle Park, PO Box 13950, NC 27709, USA; Family Health International, Research Triangle Park, PO Box 13950, NC 27709, USA; UNC-MAD, Antananarivo, Madagascar; Ministry of Health, Antananarivo, Madagascar; University of Antananarivo, Faculty of Medicine, Madagascar

We followed 1000 sex workers in Madagascar for 18 months to assess whether adding female condoms to male condom distribution led to increased protection levels and decreased sexually transmitted infections (STIs). For months 1–6, participants had access to male condoms only; in the final 12 months, they had access to male and female condoms. We interviewed participants about condom use every two months and tested for chlamydia, gonorrhoea and trichomoniasis every six months. Following six months of male condom distribution, participants used protection in 78% of sex acts with clients. Following female condom introduction, protection at months 12 and 18 rose to 83% and 88%, respectively. Aggregate STI prevalence declined from 52% at baseline to 50% at month 6. With the female condom added, STI prevalence dropped to 41% and 40% at months 12 and 18, respectively. We conclude female condom introduction is associated with increased use of protection to levels that reduce STI risk.

 

Key Words: FEMALE CONDOM • CONDOMS • SEX WORKERS • SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASE • PEER EDUCATION

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